The True Nature of Conservation: SPNI’s Dual Local and Global Focus

Jay Shofet
Modi'in southern hills. Photo Dov Greenblat

Though a cliché, it is no less a truism that the environment knows no borders.  While the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel focuses inward on what's happening in Israel, we cannot afford to ignore the environmental concerns and best practices that are negatively and positively impacting our region and areas around the globe.

As the largest environmental NGO in Israel, SPNI often interacts with other civil society players in our neighboring countries in the Middle East and with countries that are part of a European Union-designated Mediterranean Basin Biodiversity Hotspot.  In the Mare Nostrum project (“Our Sea” in Latin), for example, SPNI took the lead in coordinating with other civil society organizations across the Mediterranean Basin to create a shared framework to protect the Mediterranean Sea and coastline. 

Israel's coastline, Achzive. Photo: Dov Greenblat SPNI

A signature international project that has been driven by SPNI for decades focuses on teaching farmers to use barn owls and kestrels as natural pest control in order to reduce the amount of pesticides.  This project now involves some 5,000 nesting boxes across Israel, Jordan and Palestine.

SPNI also organizes an international birdwatching race called “Champions of the Flyway” that draws hundreds of professional and amateur birders from around the world each year and has raised $350,000 for bird conservation across Europe and Africa.  It is now among the premier international birding events.  Our expert ornithologists visit North America regularly to lead birding adventures in local hotspots and engage in conferences and competitions, all with the aim of raising support for protection of the world's crucial migration flyways.

Our relationships with other organizations in Europe have created cultural exchange opportunities for education and environmental professionals and young people from Israel, Italy, Germany and throughout the EU to share their knowledge and exchange ideas regarding how best to protect our planet and confront the challenges of climate change.

SPNI has valued supporters in countries around the globe, with affiliates in the United Kingdom and France, and of course in North America. On a recent visit to Ottawa, I met with local supporters, Canadian parliamentary officials, and the leadership of CIJA, the non-partisan Israel and Jewish advocacy arm of the Jewish Federations of Canada. These fascinating interactions will hopefully spur more international cooperation between Israeli and Canadian policy professionals regarding the shared challenges of environmental protection, such as renewable energy, land conservation, and sustainable fishing.

Jay(left) with Keinan Family at CSPNI event. Photo Yaron Eini

But we don’t only engage environmental professionals, as they alone cannot turn the tide in many environmental struggles.  The citizens of every nation around the world must join the efforts as well, and so we engage with as many of them as possible.  Meeting with our supporters – and people interested in environmental issues in Israel and locally – at parlor meetings, synagogues, JCCs and business offices always rank among favorite encounters when I travel to North America.  When I hear about dry riverbeds and wildfires in California, overfishing in the Chesapeake Bay or urban planning in Seattle, I know that we are not alone, and I can share what SPNI is doing about these and similar issues in Israel.

(Please let me know if you'd like me or one of SPNI’s other environmental professionals to visit your community in the next several months!)

Our shared environment, the biosphere on this blue planet, our healthy habitats, flowing rivers, polar ice packs, forests, jungles, savannas and deserts, and our desire to preserve them – this is what unites us.

Here in Israel, we have a humble Mediterranean scrubland habitat called batha.  It stretches throughout much of the country, along our varied topography and climatic zones.  It’s not flashy, not naturally forested, but rich in biodiversity and under the twin threats of encroachment and climate change.  We tackle challenges like these daily – protecting the batha habitat, renewing Israel's rivers and wetlands, and helping make our cities dense, sustainable, and the best possible places to live – and we wouldn’t be able to do so without the continued support of our extended conservation family in Israel and around the world.

To receive our newsletter and stay up-to-date with our ongoing conservation activities, please click here.  And be sure to follow our English Facebook page.

We invite you to join SPNI's activities and meet-ups abroad, by contacting our international affiliates as follows:

USA:  Robin Gordon, aspni@aol.com

CANADA: Avi Sadiv, canada@spni.org.il

FRANCE: Norbert Lipszyc, irl@club-internet.fr

UK: John Levy, john.levy@foi-asg.org

 

Category: Our Global Community